On Writing

Writing
(Image: canva.com)

I find it fascinating that I’ve transitioned over the course of my life from being someone who absolutely hated writing, with a passion, to someone who now primarily writes for a living.

I’ve written (ha!) about it before, but it’s true: if I had to do it all over again, I’d have invested more of my education in writing, English,and communications classes, at the expense of classes that, to this day, have not added a single thing to my life. (I’m looking at you, Chemistry 140.)

One thing you’ll hear many writers say is that writing helps them clarify their thoughts.

You’ll hear many self-improvement and non-writer types make the case that journalling in just about any form that works for you can be a fundamental approach to clarity regardless of what you do for a living.¬†While I’ve never really gotten into the journalling thing, even after many aborted attempts, any kind of writing habit you can fall back to will help.

In my case, I simply try to write 10 minutes every day. That’s it. Ten minutes. This essay started as one of my 10 minute daily writing exercises.

Sometimes my daily writing serves my day job, sometimes it’s preparation for projects like this one, sometimes it’s just me recording words as “practice”.

It’s often said that writers write. It’s the very definition of the role.

There are many people who call themselves writers who do not write on any regular schedule. On the other hand, you’ll find there are many prolific writers out there who may or may not even consider themselves writers. I daresay the latter group is often better informed, and more articulate than many “professional” writers.

I guess I’m a writer. And so I write.

But along the way I clarify my thoughts, practice a craft, and commit ideas to media.

Leave a Comment